Political Campaign Recruitment of Leaders, Celebrities, Activists to Volunteers and Paid Staffs



Ozg Political Consulting
Email: political.consulting@o-z-g.com
 Phone # 09811415605-16-27-60-81-91 


Political Campaign Recruitments of Leaders, Celebrities, Activists to Volunteers and Paid Staffs formulate and implement the strategy needed to win an election.  

This article provides a generic description of a campaign's staff and organization. Different campaigns have different structures.

Structure of a campaign

Campaigns are usually overseen by a campaign manager. The campaign manager coordinates the campaign making sure that the rest of the staff and the campaign's consultants are focused effectively on winning the election. In small local campaigns, the campaign manager will often be the only paid staff member and will be responsible for every aspect of the campaign that is not covered by the candidate or volunteers. In larger campaigns, such as a lokshabha campaign, hundreds of staff members will cover the required tasks. While campaign managers are often the lead strategists in local campaigns.
Below the department level, campaigns vary widely in their structure. On larger campaigns, there will be various coordinators for certain functions within each department. For example, within the fundraising department, there might be a staff member who focuses only on direct mail fundraising.

At the bottom of the totem pole are the interns and volunteers who perform the least glamorous tasks of the campaign. These can include entering data into databases, and canvassing voters on behalf of the campaign.

Departments and their respective purposes

Field department

The field department focuses on the "on-the-ground" organizing that is required in order to personally contact voters through canvassing, phone calls, and building local events. Voter contact helps construct and clean the campaign's voter file in order to help better target voter persuasion and identify which voters a campaign most wants to bring out on election day. Field is generally also tasked with running local "storefront" campaign offices as well as organizing phone banks and staging locations for canvasses and other campaign events.

On the state-wide level, field departments are generally organized by geography with an overall state-wide field director who oversees the efforts of several regional field directors who in turn manage several local offices.

    State Chairperson
·         State Finance Chairperson
·         District Chairperson
·         State Director
·         State Deputy Director for Volunteer Operations (Grassroots)
·         Coalitions Coordinator
·         State Deputy Director for Administration
·         Scheduling and Advance Coordinator
·         Payroll Coordinator
·         State Policy Director
·         Legislative Advisor
·         State Communications Director
·         Other field workers below this level include:

Deputy Director: generally responsible for the operations of a single office serving a county or several counties, the local organizer works to build a local organization, mostly of volunteers, that will be used to fill out campaign events, contact voters, and ultimately to provide ground troops for election day efforts.

Volunteer Coordinator: tasked full-time with recruiting, retaining, and scheduling volunteers

Field Organizer: the lowest level of field staff, these paid workers generally do direct voter contact full-time as well as assisting the Deputy Director

GOTV ("Get out the vote") coordinator: generally either brought in in the last few months of the campaign or a re-tasked staffer, GOTV coordinators plan the local GOTV efforts.


In addition to voter persuasion and voter identification, field staff will often provide information for the campaign headquarters as to what is going on in the communities they work in. Field staffers are the primary liaison between the campaign and local influentials such as interest group leaders and prominent community activists. Field departments are also often primarily responsible for the local distribution of "swag" i.e. lawn signs, bumper stickers, buttons, and other such materials.

Communications department

The communications department oversees both the press relations and advertising involved in promoting the campaign in the media. They are responsible for the campaign's message and image among the electorate. Press releases, advertisements, phone scripts, and other forms of communication must be approved by this department before they can be released to the public. The staffers within this office vary widely from campaign to campaign. However they generally include:

A press secretary who monitors the media and coordinates the campaign's relations with the press. Press secretaries set up interviews between the candidate and reporters, brief the press at press conferences, and perform other tasks involved in press relations.

A rapid response director who makes sure that the campaign responds quickly to the attacks of the other campaigns. They and their staff constantly monitor the media and the moves of their opponents, making sure that attacks are rebutted quickly.

Creative team managing all visual communications and ensuring consistency of campaign materials/merchandise (both print and digital) through web design, graphic design, advertising, promotional items. Often these staffers work closely with the IT department.

Political / Field department

Operations
·             Activists, Grassroots, and Volunteers
·             Outreach
·             Education

Researching and developing a set of policies requires a large team to research and write each plank. Researchers also provide information to the campaign on issues and the backgrounds of candidates (including the candidate they work for) in order to be aware of skeletons in the various candidates' closets. The latter practice is known as opposition research. On smaller campaigns this is often folded into the communications department.

Fundraising department

The finance department coordinates the campaign's fundraising operation and ensures that the campaign always has the money it needs to operate effectively. The techniques employed by this campaign vary based on the campaign's needs and size. Small campaigns often involve casual fundraising events and phone calls from the candidate to donors asking for money. Larger campaigns will include everything from high-priced sit-down dinners to e-mail messages to donors asking for money.

Legal department

The legal department makes sure that the campaign is in compliance with the law and files the appropriate forms with government authorities.

This department will also be responsible for all financial tracking, including bank reconciliations, loans and backup for in-kind donations. They are generally required to keep both paper and electronic files. Small campaigns will often have one person responsible for financial disclosure while larger campaigns will have dozens of lawyers and treasurers making sure that the campaign's activities are legal. After the election, the compliance and legal department must still respond to audit requests and, when required, debt retirement.

Technology department

The technology department designs and maintains campaign technology such as voter file, websites, and social media. While local (County, City, Town, or Village) campaigns might have a volunteers who know how to use computers, State and National campaigns will have Information Technology professionals across the state or country handling everything from websites to blogs to databases.

Scheduling and advance department

The scheduling and advance department makes sure that the candidate and campaign surrogates are effectively scheduled so as to maximize their impact on the voters. This department also oversees the advance people who arrive at events before the candidate to make sure everything is in order. Often, this department will be a part of the field department.

On small campaigns the scheduling coordinator may be responsible for developing and executing events. The scheduling coordinator typically: a)manages the candidate's personal and campaign schedule b)manages the field and advance team schedules c)gathers important information about all events the campaign and candidate will attend

Candidates and other members of the campaign must bear in mind that only one person should oversee the details of scheduling. Fluid scheduling is one of the many keys to making a profound impact on voters.


Ozg Political Consulting
Email: political.consulting@o-z-g.com
 Phone # 09811415605-16-27-60-81-91 

Shimla Lok Sabha Constituency


Ozg Political Consulting
Email: political.consulting@o-z-g.com
 Phone # 09811415605-16-27-60-81-91  

Shimla Lok Sabha constituency (formerly, Simla Lok Sabha constituency) is one of the four Lok Sabha (parliamentary) constituencies in Himachal Pradesh state in northern India. The seat is reserved for the candidates belonging to the Scheduled Castes.


1 Assembly segments
2 Members of Parliament


Assembly segments


Shimla Lok Sabha constituency presently comprises the following 17 Vidhan Sabha (legislative assembly) segments:
  1. Arki
  2. Nalagarh
  3. Doon
  4. Solan
  1. Kasauli
  2. Pachhad
  3. Nahan
  4. Sri Renukaji
  1. Paonta Sahib
  2. Shillai
  3. Chopal
  4. Theog
  1. Kasumpti
  2. Shimla
  3. Shimla Rural
  4. Jubbal-Kotkhai
  1. Rohru


Members of Parliament


1967: Partap Singh, Indian National Congress
1971: Partap Singh, Indian National Congress
1977: Balak Ram, Bharatiya Lok Dal
1980: Krishan Dutt Sultanpuri, Indian National Congress (I)
1984: Krishan Dutt Sultanpuri, Indian National Congress
1989: Krishan Dutt Sultanpuri, Indian National Congress
1991: Krishan Dutt Sultanpuri, Indian National Congress
1996: Krishan Dutt Sultanpuri, Indian National Congress
1998: Krishan Dutt Sultanpuri, Indian National Congress
1999: Dhani Ram Shandil, Himachal Vikas Congress
2004: Dhani Ram Shandil, Indian National Congress
2009: Virender Kashyap, Bharatiya Janata Party


Election results 2004


General Election, 2004: Simla
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Dhani Ram Shandil 2,11,182 58.86
BJP Hira Nand Kashyap 2,03,002 38.40
BSP Som Nath 1,14,471 2.74
Majority 108,180
Turnout 528,655 51.89
Congress gain from Himachal Vikas Congress Swing


Election results 2009


General Election, 2009: Simla
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
BJP Virender Kashyap 4,10,946
Congress Dhani Ram Shandil 1,83,619
BSP Somnath 8,160
Majority
Turnout
BJP gain from Congress Swing


Ozg Political Consulting
Email: political.consulting@o-z-g.com
 Phone # 09811415605-16-27-60-81-91  

Mandi Lok Sabha Constituency


Ozg Political Consulting
Email: political.consulting@o-z-g.com
 Phone # 09811415605-16-27-60-81-91  

Mandi Lok Sabha constituency is one of the four Lok Sabha (parliamentary) constituencies in Himachal Pradesh state in northern India.Pratibha Singh (born 16 June 1956) is current member of Lok Sabha from Mandi. Mandi Parliamentary constituency already emerged as a hot bed of politics where not only the BJP and the Congress will fight for their prestige, but is the only seat in the state where the Left front has popped up a candidate. The constituency was represented by Rani Amrit Kaur of the erstwhile Patiala state during 1952-57, while these areas of Himachal were still part of Punjab. In the Lok Sabha elections that followed in 1957, the seat was represented by Raja Joginder Sen of the erstwhile Mandi state, who represented the seat till 1962. In the following elections that year Raja Lalit Sen of Sundarnagar or the erstwhile Suket state was elected. He repeated his victory in the 1967 elections.

However, in period from 1977 to 1979, the constituency was represented by Ganga Singh who represented the Janata Party, which came to power at the centre immediately after the elections that followed the imposition of emergency in the country and the Congress, under Indira Gandhi was routed. He defeated Congress candidate Virbhadra Singh.
Then came along the man, who called himself the son-of-the-soil, Sukh Ram. He switched from state politics to the Parliament and won comfortably in 1985. In the next election, however, it was again another blue-blooded royal, Maheshwar Singh, scion of the erstwhile Kullu state who drubbed the son-of-the-soil at the polls.
But Sukh Ram bounced back and won again in 1994, but was expelled from the Congress a couple of years later, following the reported recovery of large amounts of cash from his residence. To re-establish his political dominion Sukh Ram floated Himachal Vikas Congress and came back into politics with a bang – winning five Assembly seats in 1998 along with wresting Shimla (reserved) parliamentary seat from the Congress in 1999. In 1998, Sukh Ram’s HVC under an alliance with the BJP supported the candidature of Maheshwar Singh, who won easily. In 2004, Congress candidate Pratibha Singh defeated Maheshwar Singh. In the last Parliament elections 2009, Congress candidate Virbhadra Singh defeated Maheshwar Singh by a very small gap.

1 Assembly segments
2 Members of Parliament


Assembly segments


Mandi Lok Sabha constituency presently comprises the following 17 Vidhan Sabha (legislative assembly) segments:
  1. Bharmour
  2. Lahaul  Spiti
  3. Manali
  4. Kullu
  1. Banjar
  2. Anni
  3. Karsog
  4. Sundernagar
  1. Nachan
  2. Seraj
  3. Darang
  4. Jogindernagar
  1. Mandi
  2. Balh
  3. Sarkaghat
  4. Rampur
  1. Kinnaur


Members of Parliament


1952: Rajkumari Amrit Kaur, Indian National Congress
1957: Joginder Sen, Indian National Congress
1962: Lalit Sen, Indian National Congress
1967: Lalit Sen, Indian National Congress
1971: Virbhadra Singh, Indian National Congress
1977: Ganga Singh, Bharatiya Lok Dal
1980: Virbhadra Singh, Indian National Congress (Socialist)
1984: Sukh Ram, Indian National Congress
1989: Maheshwar Singh, Bharatiya Janata Party
1991: Sukh Ram, Indian National Congress
1996: Sukh Ram, Indian National Congress
1998: Maheshwar Singh, Bharatiya Janata Party
1999: Maheshwar Singh, Bharatiya Janata Party
2004: Pratibha Singh, Indian National Congress
2009: Virbhadra Singh, Indian National Congress
2013: Pratibha Singh, Indian National Congress(By Poll)


Election results


General Election, 1951: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Amrit Kaur 47,152 26.89
Congress Gopi Ram 41,433 26.63
KMPP Tej Singh 19,872 11.33
SCF Anokhi Ram 18,988 10.83
Socialist Muni Lal 16,780 9.57
BJS Hari Dutt 12,053 6.87
Independent Kahan Singh 19,099 10.89
Majority
Turnout
Congress gain from KMPP Swing
General Election, 1957: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Joginder Sen Bahadur 57,530 63.47
CPI Mast Ram 0 00.00
Independent Anand Chand 33,110 36.53
Majority
Turnout
Congress gain from CPI Swing
General Election, 1962: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Lalit Sen 46,856 63.56
Swatantra Party Ambika Kumari 20,600 27.95
BJS Kuldip Singh 2,742 3.72
Independent Tej Singh 3,516 4.77
Majority
Turnout
Congress gain from Swatantra Party Swing
General Election, 1967: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Lalit Sen 62,596 51.65
Independent I. Singh 28,331 23.38
Independent D.S.Ram 26,877 22.18
Independent N.D. Joshi 3,377 2.79
Majority
Turnout
Congress gain from [[I. Singh|Template:I. Singh/meta/shortname]] Swing
General Election, 1971: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Virbhadra Singh 1,14,957 71.95
LRP Mandhar Lal 25,780 16.14
NCO Gauri Prashad 6,344 3.97
Independent Nawal Thakur 4,914 3.08
Independent Mahavr Prashad 4,587 0.87
Independent Tulsi Ram 3,182 1.99
Majority
Turnout
Congress gain from LRP Swing
General Election, 1977: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Virbhadra Singh 1,02,638 39.52
BLD Ganga Singh 1,38,143 53.19
CPI(M) Tara Chand 8,950 3.45
Independent Nawal Thakur 7,817 3.01
Independent Ani Rudh 2,167 0.83
Majority
Turnout
BLD gain from Congress Swing
General Election, 1980: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
IC(S) Virbhadra Singh 1,66,949 56.60
Janata Party Ganga Singh 1,08,595 36.82
JNP(S) Bhagat Guru 12,544 4.25
Independent Puran Mal 4,626 1.57
Independent Naval Thakur 2,255 0.76
Majority
Turnout
Congress gain from Janata Party Swing
General Election, 1984: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Sukh Ram 2,24,146 67.52
BJP Madhukar Singh 92,495 27.86
INC(J) Nand Singh 3,817 1.15
Janata Party Het Ram 2,331 0.70
Independent Kamal Kishore 2,921 0.88
Independent Narpat Ram Chauhan 2,616 0.79
Independent Nawal Thakur 2,453 0.74
Independent Durga Singh Rathore 1,194 0.36
Majority
Turnout
Congress gain from BJP Swing
General Election, 1989: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Sukh Ram 2,06,095 44.33
BJP Maheshwar Singh 2,34,164 50.36
CPI(M) D.N. Kapoor 9,736 2.09
Doordarshi Party O.M. Prakash 5,510 1.19
BSP Dharam Singh 4,489 0.97
Janata Party Naval Thaur 3,423 0.74
Independent Raj Kumar 1,530 0.33
Majority
Turnout
BJP gain from Congress Swing
General Election, 1991: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Sukh Ram 2,33,380 49.70
BJP Maheshwar Singh 2,06,753 44.03
Janata Dal Karam Singh 18,112 3.86
Shiv Sena Subh Ram Thakray 790 0.15
Doordarshi Party Om Prakash 3970 0.85
Janata Party Prem Singh Thakur 2,829 0.60
Independent Om Dutt Sharma 1,954 0.37
Independent Krishan Lal Sharma 1049 0.20
Independent Amar Nirogotra 936 0.18
Independent Nawal Thakur 768 0.15
Independent Gian Chand Paniala 739 0.14
Independent Jeevan Parkash Sharma 695 0.13
Independent Brikam Ram 449 0.09
Independent Ramesh Kumar Garla 294 0.06
Majority
Turnout
Congress gain from BJP Swing
General Election, 1996: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Sukh Ram 3,28,186 62.44
BJP Adan Singh Thakur 1,74,963 33.29
Samajwadi Party Ganga Singh 6,460 1.23
Shiv Sena Subh Ram Thakray 790 0.15
IC(T) Chandermani Sharma 3,717 0.71
Independent Amar Nirgotra 4,608 0.88
Independent Kanshi Ram 1,954 0.37
Independent Devender Sharma 1049 0.20
Independent Bal Krishan 936 0.18
Independent Diwan Chand Gupta 768 0.15
Independent Ramesh Chand Gautam 739 0.14
Independent Jeevan Parkash Sharma 695 0.13
Independent Brikam Ram 449 0.09
Independent Ramesh Kumar Garla 294 0.06
Majority
Turnout
Congress gain from BJP Swing
General Election, 1998: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
BJP Maheshwar Singh 3,04,210 62.44
Congress Pratibha Singh 1,72,378 35.38
Himachal Vikas Congress Sukh Ram 8,304 1.70
Samajwadi Janata Party (Rashtriya) Dina Nath 1,265 0.26
Independent Amar Nirgotra 1081 0.22
Majority 1,31,832
Turnout 4,90,660
BJP gain from Congress Swing
General Election, 1999: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Kaul Singh 1,94,904 37.11
BJP Maheshwar Singh 3,25,929 62.05
NCP Ravi Thakur 3,657 0.7
Independent Amar Nirgotra 750 0.14
Majority
Turnout 5,28,636 54.56
BJP gain from Congress Swing
General Election, 2004: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Pratibha Singh 357,623 53.41
BJP Maheshwar Singh 291,057 43.47
BSP Mohan Lal Sahni 8,671 1.30
Independent Shah Mohammad 8,076 1.21
Independent Kashmir Singh Guleria 4,125 0.62
Majority 66,566
Turnout 669,552 62.91
Congress gain from BJP Swing
General Election, 2009: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Virbhadra Singh 3,40,973 47.82 -5.59
BJP Maheshwar Singh 3,26,976 45.85 +2.38
BSP Lala Ram 10,131 1.42 +0.12
CPI(M) DR. ONKAR SHAD 20,664 2.89
RWS Hookam Chand Shastri 7,877 1.10
Independent Shan Mohammad 6,405 0.89
Majority
Turnout 7,13,026 64.09 +1.18
Congress gain from BJP Swing
General Election, 2013: Mandi
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Congress Pratibha Singh 3,53,492 62.82 +5.59
BJP Jairam Thakur 2,16,768 34.85 -2.38
Majority
Turnout 7,13,026 64.09 +1.18
Congress gain from BJP Swing

Stations and 2 Auxiliary polling staons are being set up in the Four Parliamentary Constituencies for Lok Sabha Elections – 2009 in the State. 1259 Pole been declared as sensitive while 708 polling Stations have been classified as Hypersensitive to ensure free and fair elections in the State. The maximum number of Hyper Sensitive Polling Stations is 197 in Kangra District, he added. However, the largest number of Polling Stations was 1921 in 2-Mandi Parliamentary Constituency, including the Auxiliary Polling Station in Jogindernagar Assembly Constituency.


Ozg Political Consulting
Email: political.consulting@o-z-g.com
 Phone # 09811415605-16-27-60-81-91